Mrs Bowden’s top tip – coloured tailor’s tacks

Shelf Bust dress – creating the pleated bust

Occasionally you can come across different sized circles on a commercial pattern to differentiate areas on the garment being made.  You will often see this when pleats or tucks are being created.  I am presently working on Butterick 5882 by Gertie, a reproduction pattern inspired by 1950’s ‘Shelf bust’ dresses.

Butterick by Gertie B5882

Butterick by Gertie B5882

A shelf bust accentuates the upper bust line by incorporating a pleated or ruched layer of fabric – this line is often emphasised by strapping or banding between the lower bodice and insert.

shelf bust dress

Original Simplicity Shelf =bust dress

Or in the case of this polka dot beauty, additional beading!

Beading to emphasise the raised bust line.

Beading to emphasise the raised bust line.

The insert has to be carefully prepared to fit – hence the numerous pleat lines indicated on the pattern.

Multi sized pleating madness!

Multi sized pleating madness!

This is made all the more confusing when working on a multi-size pattern such as this.

Green thread for small circles

Green thread for small circles

Matching the tailor’s tacks allows the pleats to be formed and there is a direction to follow to cause the folds to flow in the same direction.  Note that irrespective of the size being created the placement lines are the same on the centre front line – they sizing changes at the side only.  This leads to my top tip.

Red thread for large circles

Red thread for large circles

Use different coloured threads to mark the big circles and little circles.

Clearly marked pleat placement

Clearly marked pleat placement

It should speed up the process of creating the pleats and cause less confusion as to the placement lines.

Toile in action

Toile in action

In stitches,  Amanda xxx

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